Scientists Have Found a Way to Use Spider Venom to Save Honeybees

Scientists at Newcastle University have created a pesticide safe for bees, made from spider venom and a special flower protein.
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Scientists at Newcastle University have created a pesticide safe for bees, made from spider venom and a special flower protein.
bee

Photo Credit: © photomic - Fotolia.com

Scientists at Newcastle University have found a way to potentially save the honeybee population. They have created a biologically-based pesticide made from spider venom and special flower protein that is harmless to bees. The insecticide is called Hv1/GNA and will kill other bugs while keeping bees alive and well. 

Honeybees have been slowly disappearing in Europe and the United States, due to what scientists believe is unintended ingestion of pesticides. Some experts stay if bees were to become extinct, the human race would only survive for four years. 

Some might not think the survival of honeybees is very important, but the little yellow and black pests have a huge part to play in agriculture. More than 90 percent of the world's plants and more than 100 American crops rely on honeybees for pollination. 

There are other alternatives to using pesticides. Crops can be rotated to avoid pests finding permanent homes, using crops that have a natural resistance to pests, or using pesticides specific to certain plants. 

Hopefully farmers take note of these new methods. As much as we might hate the little buzzers, bees are necessary for our survival.