Sainsbury's Store Goes Off the Grid, Thanks to Its Own Rotting Food

A U.K. outpost of the popular supermarket chain runs entirely on biomethane gas made from its own recycled food waste.
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A U.K. outpost of the popular supermarket chain runs entirely on biomethane gas made from its own recycled food waste.
rotting strawberries

Photo Credit: Steven Depolo/Flickr

A Sainsbury's supermarket in Cannock, England has gone off the electrical grid, running solely on biomethane gas made from the store's food waste.

Sainsbury's works with waste management company Biffa for the eco-friendly endeavor. Store management first donates food fit for human consumption to local charities, then donates what it can from the leftovers to make animal feed. The rest goes to Biffa's anaerobic digestion plant, where it becomes biomethane gas.

The biomethane gas is then transported back to Sainsbury's via a 1.5-kilometer cable.

"Sainsbury's sends absolutely no waste to landfill and we're always looking for new ways to reuse and recycle," said Paul Crewe, Sainsbury's head of sustainability, to the BBC.

The BBC adds that the energy produced by the Cannock Sainsbury's location would be enough to power 2,500 homes each year.