Project Daniel: 3-D Printing Prosthetic Arms for Children in Sudan

How Not Impossible set up the world’s 1st prosthetic lab powered by 3-D printers and helped a 14-year-old boy named Daniel to feed himself for the first time in 2 years.
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
773
How Not Impossible set up the world’s 1st prosthetic lab powered by 3-D printers and helped a 14-year-old boy named Daniel to feed himself for the first time in 2 years.

Just before Thanksgiving 2013, Mick Ebeling returned home from Sudan's Nuba Mountains where Not Impossible set up what is probably the world's first 3D-printing prosthetic lab and training facility. More to the point of the journey is that the Not Impossible team managed to give hope and independence back to Daniel Omar who, at age 14, had both his arms blown off by a bomb dropped on his village and considered his life not worth living. 

Just prior to the trip, the now 16-year-old Daniel was located in a 70,000 person refugee camp in Yida. Now disbanded, due to escalated fighting in the South Kordofan region, Yida was named "one of the most challenging refugee camps in the world," by the United Nations.  

Despite the hostile political and geographic conditions, on November 11th 2013 Daniel received version 1 of his left arm. The "Daniel Arm" enabled him to feed himself for the first time in two years. 

Daniel Eating

Daniel practicing by eating spoonfuls of sugar (of course!)

After Daniel had been fitted with his prosthetic, and with the help of Dr. Tom Catena, an American doctor and the sole physician left working in the Nuba Mountains, Mick and the team set about teaching local clinicians and villagers to assemble 3-D prostheses. 

By the time the team returned to their homes in the U.S., the local trainees had successfully printed and fitted another two arms on their own. Until fighting and the most recent bombing of the Mother of Mercy Hospital made it unsafe to continue, the lab was printing an arm-a-week. 

PD press (lighter bkg)