Is the Old School Walker Out of Date? Can We "Not Impossible" a New One?

This 64 year-old former medical librarian with 2 daughters and 4 grandchildren wants us to build a better walker - does someone in the Not Impossible community have the answer?
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This 64 year-old former medical librarian with 2 daughters and 4 grandchildren wants us to build a better walker - does someone in the Not Impossible community have the answer?

We received a letter (below) from a daughter wanting to do something for her Mom, Judy Sherman. Two years ago, the 64 year-old former medical librarian with a loving husband, 2 daughters and 4 grandchildren started losing her balance.  

The "Cerebellar Ataxia" with which Judy is diagnosed presents its symptoms as an inability to coordinate balance, gait, extremity and eye movements. While there are treatments showing promising results, it is widely thought to be untreatable. 

Judy is reliant on a "walker" to get around. 

Though her device is a step-up from those with tennis balls stuck on the base of each leg, the walker is still fairly similar to those used several decades ago, and, of most importance, it doesn't enable Judy to operate independently. 

Can a walker truly give a person independence?

Is there a way the walker could be:

- less likely to tip/more stable 

- more easily able to be slid in and out of her back seat

- better able to descend a slope

- better able to deal with imperfect surfaces

- lighter

Can a walker become sturdy enough to provide single-handed support for climbing stairs, but light enough to be utilized easily? Or does someone out there know of something that's already available that has all the answers?

What say you, Not Impossible?

Letter